Japan 2015
Japan 2015
Japan 2015
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Travel blogs for those interested in cycle touring Japan are few and far between, so I thought I'd add some notes from my own recent cycling trip to the land of the rising sun.

In my view there's no better way to see a country, culture and people than from 2 wheels. I looked at some organised trips but the few I could find didn't go where or when I wanted. So I set about organising a self-guided trip, managing to convince two good friends, Stu & Tamsyn, to come along too.

The first things to decide were When & Where to go.

The When was easy as I wanted to see two things - the cherry blossom (Sakura) that runs from late March to early April and something called the Tateyama Alpine Route, which opens with famed Japanese punctually on 16th April every year. This left us the middle two weeks of April.

The Where was more fluid but key locations we wanted to see included Tokyo, Kyoto, Mt Fuji and Hiroshima.

The idea was to spend 4-5 days cycling, a few days sightseeing in Kyoto, then another few days cycling on my own as Stu & Tamsyn planned to return to the UK after Kyoto.

If you're thinking about a possible cycling trip in Japan, here are a few things you may wish to consider...

My best advice is to leave enough time in each day for sightseeing. You can't cycle 8+ hours a day and stop for extended periods to see the attractions, so I would recommend planning to spend as much time sightseeing as cycling. An obvious point but you also can't pedal as far or as fast when your bike's loaded up with luggage!

We stuck to about 80km / 50miles per day as a working maximum, which left plenty of time to stop and see the sights whenever we wanted.

We found that cycle touring isn't quite as widespread in Japan as Europe yet. In the centre of some large cities we thought it sometimes felt safer / more appropriate to cycle on the pavement rather than the road - this is also what most locals appear to do. We only really did this in the very centre of Kyoto though.

In the country and suburbs things are more familiar. We were always given ample space by other road users. There are also some fantastic small back roads, ideal for cycling - you just need to spend a bit of time on Google or Bings maps to pick them them out.
Widely acknowledged as one of the best bargains in world travel, the Japan Rail (JR) Pass allows virtually uninhibited travel on the JR network for its duration (it comes in weekly blocks). The rail network here is awesome - fast, clean and always on-time.

There are a number of tiers of rail travel from the super-fast Shinkansen (Bullet train) to local stopper services.

To get a JR Pass, you buy a voucher from your home country over the internet which is sent to you in the post. When you arrive at the airport in Japan you queue up and exchange the voucher for an actual JR Pass which has your photo on it. Once you've got the pass, you can 'buy' as many tickets as you like.

A slight oddity is that you can't buy train tickets from the JR Desk at the airport - you can only exchange the voucher for your pass here. You must go to one of the larger JR Stations (e.g. Central Tokyo) to use your pass to buy tickets.
I mostly used Topeak cycle gear, which I found to be light and durable. I have seen a small number of online reviews that have questioned their quality - particularly regarding the zips and seams. I had no such problems though.

I was also fortunate enough to have a family friend make me a rather cool custom frame bag, which provided convenient storage for tools, snacks and wet weather clothing.
To take a bike on a train, you'll need a train / Shinkansen travel bag. These aren't optional. You won't be allowed on a train if your bike's not at least partially packed into one.

They are thin, light bags that cover the icky, oily parts of your bike. They fold up really small into your luggage when not in use.

The next thing to note is that there are no designated bike spaces on trains. On a Shinkansen, things are easy though as there's ample room at the end of every carriage to stow 2-3 bikes behind the last row of seats. If the space in your carriage is full (it won't be) just take your bike to the next carriage.

On local services, the situation varies. Some trains we went on were wide and open (seats along the sides facing in), with designated areas for luggage, where we rested our bikes. Others, were traditional forward-facing row layouts. One time, at the direction of the guard, we had to put our bikes on seats in first class while we roughed it out in cattle class!

We never had a porblem in more than 12 separate train journeys.
The easiest (not the only) way to take a bike on a plane is in a bike box. This gives you a problem when you arrive at Japan though - what do you do with the box!? One option is to try tapping up your local hotelier to see if they'll let you leave it with them.

Alternatively, you can book the bike box in at the luggage desk at your airport. This cost me about £60 for two weeks (Haneda) but at least you know it's safe, secure and will be there when you return. It does mean you need to take the bike out of the box at the airport, so you can check in.
We used K's guesthouse wherever possible and were never disappointed. We supplemented these with the odd night in a hotel but really only where we couldn't find a K's. There are currently about 6 - 7 K's in Japan, spread nicely across the country, including all the main tourist destinations (Tokyo, Kyoto, Fuji etc).

I would also highly recommend staying at least one night in a traditional Japanese Ryokan. See day 5 for more details on these.
Japan has a surprisingly wide range of temperatures. Kyoto and Tokyo can be hot and sunny enough to burn in April, while Takayama and the Alps, just 100 miles to the west can have snow at relatively low altitudes. This can block smaller roads in the mountains, so take this into account if planning to travel in spring or autumn.

The Japanese Alps seem receive a high snow fall during the winter, which is one of their major attractions.
Despite a few things I'd read online, my UK iPhone 5 worked just fine. However, the cost of calls and data (using my UK contract) are extortionate in Japan.

Therefore I'd recommend either keeping phone use for emergencies or pre-ordering a Japanese SIM (such as bmobile) from the UK. You'll need an unlocked phone.

I went for a 2GB SIM which is ample for a 2 week stay. Note that these are data-only SIMs and can't be used to make voice calls, unless you use a Voice Over IP (VOIP) services such as Skype.

I also rented a 'Mi-Fi' hotspot device. In retrospect, this was over overkill and I could easily have managed with just one of these options. A hotspot device is easier though if you don't want to get your phone unlocked. It creates a small wi-fi zone around the device (a few meters) which you can connect to from other devices (iPads, phones etc). Again, no voice calls are possible but you can use Skype & VOIP apps.

One final note, it's not as easy as you might expect to arrange either of these when you're actually in Japan, so try and get either of these options booked over the internet before you leave home.
Cycling in Japan »
Japan Rail Pass »
Cycle Gear »
Bikes on Trains »
Bikes on Planes »
Accommodation »
Weather »
Phone & Comms »
Cycling in Japan »
Japan Rail Pass »
Cycle Gear »
Bikes on Trains »
Bikes on Planes »
Accommodation »
Weather »
Phone & Comms »
Cycling in Japan »
Japan Rail Pass »
Cycle Gear »
Bikes on Trains »
Bikes on Planes »
Accommodation »
Weather »
Phone & Comms »
 
Day 1 - Arrivals - Tokyo
Day 2 - Long train to Kanazawa
Day 3 - Kanazawa to Shirakawa-go
Day 4 - Shirakawa-go to Takayama
Day 5 - Gero to Tsumago-juku
Day 6 - Tsumago-juku to Hikone
Day 7 - Hikone - Kyoto
Day 8 - Kyoto - Fushimi & Sagano
Day 9 - Hiroshima & Himaji
Day 10 - Kyoto - Kinkakuji & Kiyomizu-dera
Day 11 - Shinfuji to Fujikawaguchiko
Day 12 - Fujikawaguchiko to Shiojiri
Day 13 - Tateyama Alpine Route
Day 14-15 - Departure - Tokyo
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